Features

Research & Reports

  • School Food Gardens—Benefits to Students

    There is growing interest around the world for using gardens as a hands-on learning opportunity that can be integrated into a wide-range of subject areas. Studies of food-producing gardens in schools cite many benefits.

  • The GREEN Tool: For Well Integrated School Gardens

    Why do some gardens flourish while others start out with a bang but fizzle over time? Columbia University's Laurie M. Tisch Centre for Food, Education & Policy identified 19 components shared by successful gardens in 21 New York City schools

  • Garden Program in Australia Shows Positive Health Behaviour Change

    Both, teachers and parents have noticed positive health behaviour changes in children that have been involved with the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden National Program in Australia.

  • Gardening Boosts Numeracy, Literacy and Makes Children Happy, Healthy

    The Royal Horticulture Society in the UK commissioned a study of 1300 teachers and 10 schools. They found the children in schools that encouraged gardening became more resilient, confident and lived healthier lives. The RHS says school gardening should be used as a key teaching tool, rather than as an extra-curricular activity.

  • Gardening & Cooking at School Increases Vegetable and Fruit Consumption

    A 3-year study done by the University of California at Berkeley concluded, "Younger students in (schools with integrated cooking and gardening education programs) increased fruit and vegetable consumption by nearly one and a half servings per day."

Making it Happen: Healthy Eating at School
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